Hocus Focus… A Conversation With Grant Rodiek


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Hi everyone. I’m back. It has been a while. I apologize for that. It has been graduation time in my household – one daughter from UNC-CH and one from high school. So it has been very busy here. And no time to record. But that’s over now and I should be back on schedule in the next week or so.

This time out I have Grant Rodiek. Grant is the fantastic game designer of Hocus, Farmageddon, and Cry Havoc coming very soon from Portal Games. We talk about each of these games as well as Grant’s super website, Hyperbole Games. You can find out more about Hyperbole Games here. This is a fun and informative interview. I hope you like it. If so please leave a comment.

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With A Cherry On Top…A Conversation With Josh Mills


Joshua Mills

This episode I’m talking to up-and-coming game designer Josh Mills. We talk about Josh’s game, Rocky Road A La Mode, coming soon from Green Couch Games. We also discuss being part of a game design group, Unpub, and some of Josh’s in-progress games. And we are joined by my son, Zachary. It’s a really fun show.

If you enjoyed the show, why not leave a comment or a tweet telling me so. You can contact me at goforthandgame@gmail.com and @goforthandgame or @tomgurg. Thanks!!

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Smokin’ – A Conversation With… Darrell Louder, the designer of Compounded & co-designer of Bottom of the 9th. Oh, and Chris Kirkman too.


This time I’m talking with game designer Darrell Louder, creator of Compounded and co-designer of Bottom of the Ninth. Darrell and I chat about those games, bbq, and a new game he is co-designing with only Richard Lanius. Yeah, Darrell’s pretty jazzed about that. Oh, and Chris Kirkman joins us too.

So head on over to ITunes and grab the episode and subscribe to the podcast while you are at it. Leave some review stars too if you don’t mind. Or listen right here. http://traffic.libsyn.com/goforthandgame/Darrell_Louder_2016.mp3

A Pack O Fun – A Conversation With … Chris Handy of Perplext Games About Pack O Game 2


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Wee Strategy Games For On The Go Gamers!

In this episode Chris Handy of Perplext Games is my guest. Chris has been designing games for quite a few years and is known for Longshot, Plext, and Cinque Terre. He is also known for Pack O Game, a unique, innovative game format that he blasted onto the world last year. Pack O Game is games are 30 cards in a 1 x 3 inch size. That’s the same size as a pack of gum. Very portable and a lot of fun. Pack O Game Set 1 has a variety of game levels, from very casual to gamer targeted. They were well designed and accessible games.

Well Chris is back with Pack O Game 2! Same format but this set is more gamer level focused. GYM, SOW, ORC, and RUM are four very good games that fit in your shirt pocket. Chris sent me all to preview and their size is deceptive. They have meat. There are tough decisions in each. Each is interesting in different ways. I liked each of them. Not only did satisfy the game in me, my children liked them a lot too. You are going to want these.

They launched on Kickstarter today and are already +85% funded aleady. For only $20 ($24 after Friday) you get FOUR games + all stretch goals. And guess what the stretch goals are – more games! Yes, there is a potential to get up to 8 games for $20! You need to head over to Kickstarter and back these games so I can get all eight. The link is right here.

These are elepant sized games in a mouse sized package.

Oh, by the way. I did a podcast with Chris. We talk about all the Pack O Games. You can get it over on iTunes (leave a star or four) or check it out below.

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A Conversation With…AJ Porifirio of Van Ryder Games & Rob Couch About Saloon Tycoon


Box for date announcementThis episode I talk to AJ Porifirio and Rob Couch about their new game, Saloon Tycoon. AJ’s company, Van Ryder Games, is publishing through Kickstarter. The episode was recorded prior to the Kickstarter launch. In this show we talk about game design, Hostage Negotiator, and several other things. Saloon Tycoon has already funded so it will be produced. You should check it out here. And head over to iTunes and subscribe to the podcast.

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Thanks for reading and listening. Tell your friends!

A Conversation With…Diane Sauer of Shoot Again Games


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This time Diane Sauer of Shoot Again Games talks with me. We discuss Conspiracy!, Shoot Again’s newest game. There’s talk about Bigfoot, artifacts, men in black, and string. This was a really fun interview. The Conspiracy! campaign is fully funded but ends in three days so head over here to support it.

 

Please head over to iTunes and subscribe to Go Forth And Game Podcast.

Next up: Saloon Tycoon!

 

A Conversation With … Chris Kirkman of Dice Hate Me Games


It’s been a very long time coming but I finally sat down with my friend Chris Kirkman (@dicehateme) of Dice Hate Me and Greater Than Games. We talk about comics, Club Zen and Don’t Get Eated, and what Chris is working on these days. It’s a fun  so download it here or at iTunes. Oh, and leave me a good review if you don’t mind.

 Next up: Shoot Again Games

Down In Flames – A Conversation With…Dan Letzring About Dirigible Disaster


In this episode I talk to Letiman Games head honcho Dan Letzring. Dan and I discuss his previous game, Dino Dude Ranch (which is fun!) and delve into Dirigible Disaster, Letiman’s most recent. Dirigible Disaster is in its last couple of weeks on Kickstarter. It’s funded so it will be produced. Here over here to check it out.

A Conversation With … Michael Knight About VENOM Assault


My guest this time is Michael Knight, the co-designer of VENOM Assault. VENOM Assault is a co-op about a special ops team battling the evil, world-spanning organization VENOM. It’s a really fun interview with a pretty cool guy. VENOM Assault is currently on Kickstarter right here.  You’ll find the interview below or on iTunes.

Please consider subscribing to the podcast on iTunes and even leave a nice rating. I would appreciate that.

Jamey Stegmaier Interviews Me – Part 2


Thanks for coming back for Part 2. It will be worth it. I had forgotten how interesting I sound (and Jamey to of course). I hope you enjoy.

Tom: Rhythm. That’s the key. I need a rhythm. And a goal. I need something to shoot for. You have inspired me Mr. Stegmaier!

Jamey: As for the advice, other than what I wrote above, I have a formatting suggestion for bloggers: Write the blog in a way that is easy for people to read. That is, use very short paragraphs, short sentences, and lots of lists and images. Breaking down content into smaller chunks makes it much easier for people to read.

Tom: I like that advice a lot. I tend to run on and on. I will definitely work on this. Starting with this interview. ( I would like to request some pictures now.)

Jamey: Do you have any tactical suggestions like that for fellow bloggers? What’s your favorite gaming-related blog to read and what makes you keep returning to it (both in terms of content and format)?

Tom: Two pop up immediately – Cardboard Edison and Hyperbole Games. Cardboard Edison compiles info from hundreds of gaming sites every day or so. It makes it easy to find real gems. And the folks who run it are awesome. They have a Patreon fund raising campaign going that everyone should check out.

Grant Rodiek of Hyperbole Games is such a prolific blogger about games. And he really delves into gaming why’s, how’s, and many aspects of game design. Every designer and gamer interested in design should visit Hyperbole Games regularly.

Format? I agree with you on the short and sweet points. People will not spend time on a blog unless you get to the point. The K.I.S.S. philosophy works well. AND we will probably have to break this interview into three or four parts if I am serious about starting to live by that. Give the people what they want – quick, useful, pretty. Or at least grab them, draw them in with that.

Tactical suggestions? Take the high ground. On first glance that sounds like a joke and facecious but it’s not. Set high standards for yourself and live by them. Don’t get caught up in the latest BGG or Twitter fire fight, unless you REALLY care about the topic and are contributing something positive / solutional to the situation. Don’t pick fights. Don’t get too emotional. Take a breath. Then respond if you feel it is necessary. There have been some recent scuffles that I almost jumped into because they struck emotional nerves.

Jamey: I really, really like what you’ve shared here about taking the high ground (in a humble way). I actually just wrote an article about customer service, so this idea fits perfectly with that. It’s often our instinct to get defensive, but if you treat people with respect and create a dialogue with them, you might find that you have a really loyal reader at your back from then on. And for the people who just like to pick fights, if you don’t fight back, they’ll quickly move on.

Tom: The biggest fight I know of  at the moment is on Kickstarter – why do backers or potential backers now feel that a game HAS to have finished art when the project is in the campaign? A few months ago, prototype are was fine. Why the change? Do you understand what Kickstarter is about? I don’t get them. It was very apparent in a recent campaign and possibly affected the outcome of that project. I don’t get them. Oh, man. I was starting to rant.

Jamey: That’s really interesting. I think it might be because some people associate a game without finished art with an unfinished game in terms of mechanisms and testing. It’s often a fallacy, but the association is there. Also, some backers may have been burned by projects that needed “just a little more art,” and 2 years later they still don’t have the game.

However, I think it’s a good point to remind backers of–one of the biggest up-front costs for a tabletop game is the art, so if you’re raising money for the game, the art probably isn’t complete. I think the key is feature a few beautiful, evocative pieces that represent the overall art in the game, and have a specific schedule in place for the rest of the art to be complete if you successfully fund.

I’m actually working on an “open letter to backers”. Other than the art rant, what’s one thing you’d like to remind backers of (or something they could be better or more understanding of), and what’s one piece of positive backer behavior you’d like to reinforce so it continues?

Tom: I’ll tackle the second question first. Backer behaviour to reinforce?

Jamey: Yep! What’s one thing you’d like backers to continue doing?

Tom: Other than continue backing? Talking up the projects they are backing. Continue the verbal support. Keep up the word of mouth marketing that Kickstarter projects depend on. Without that many I’m sure many projects would not fund.

Jamey: I think that’s a great point. If a backer feels strongly about a project, it’s great if they go out and share it. Sometimes people are hesitant to blast a message out on social media, so as a creator I encourage backers once or twice during a project to share the project with 1-2 people who they think might really like it.

Tom: As to something backers could be more understanding about I believe people should really understand how much work creating a game takes. There are lots of game campaigns and that probably gives an impression that it is easy to create a game and run a KS campaign. I know from interviews and because I have a good friend who has run quite a few campaigns that it is hard work. It takes a huge amount of time and there are so many things that pop up and are under the radar. So I wish backers would really take this in.

 

Stay tuned for the grand finale of this super duper interview.