Category: Feedback Frenzy

Feedback Is Back.


It’s been a very long time since I posted any podcast feedback.  Mainly because I had not been listening to any podcasts nor when I did, was not able to take notes.  Feedback was the reason for starting this blog.  It’s about time I returned to it.  So here we go.

A lot of these are old podcasts so bear with me.

I have to begin with Pulp Gamer – Out of Character.  Don and the gang were very supportive of me beginning Go Forth And Game.  I’ll begin with the ‘Games To Be Thankful For’ episode.  There was a lot of mention of ‘The Canon of The Game’ and sticking to or not sticking to it.  In keeping with the theme here are some games I’m thankful for:  Memoir ’44, Homesteaders, Macao, Fiasco, FATE.

They did an episode on Crime in Games.  Leverage was one that was mentioned.  I’ve never seen the TV show it is based on but from their description and those of others, this is one I need to check out.  When people talk about crime in games, especially rpg’s, I immediately think of Fiasco.  I LOVE this game.  I really need to do a review.

Narrative Control 56 covered change in your characters and how to deal with it.  Characters changing during a game or especially a campaign is something to expect.  Characters should grow.  Players should be willing to seriously consider change and where that change can lead.  Change can result in some really cool stories.  As an example my character Jind in our Diaspora game changed radically during character creation from my original idea of him.  And that change has had a major impact on the game.

Narrative Control 57 was about Apocalypse World, Vincent Baker’s newest game.  There has been a lot of buzz on this game, both good and negative.  One of the main points I picked up was that AW tells the players how to play.  This is an interesting thing and generated a lot of discussion in the show.  It seems so simple that we overlook or assume that the game has done this.  But some games don’t.  I appreciated them bringing this out.  I will use it for ‘comatose’ or what ever it will be called.  Another thing they liked about AW was the inclusion of examples of bad play or how not to play.  What a good idea.  All in all the show made me want to check out this game, if only for the GM advice and to see another way to write an rpg.  Note: AW seems like a good game to do a Thundarr game.

I rediscovered Reasonable Faith.  This is a podcast by Christian apologist William Lane Craig.  This is always an excellent podcast that makes me think.  I will do a proper feedback in another post.

I listened to a Please Convince Me show too.  I will cover it in the same post as Reasonable Faith.

The Game Kennel covered Tigris & Euphrates.  I have played it once and really like it.  The Pulpsters do a good job of covering T&E.  It is a deep game, a thinky game.  There is a lot to keep up with and remember.  They are right that you need multiple plays to get your head around it.  I like it and it is on the Buy List.

Voice of The Revolution covered Monsters And Other Childish Things.  This sounds like a fun game.  What really interests me is the One Role Engine (ORE) system it uses.  ORE is a rich dice system in which a single roll of the dice yields more than just a number.  It uses all aspects of the dice.  Pip number of each die, dice color, doubles, high/low – information you can garner from one roll of the dice.  This idea fascinates me.  Wringing all the information you can from your mechanics and props is an awesome idea.  I’m using it in a couple of game I’m developing – The Survivor, The Accused, and The Gold Rush.  This idea streamlines a game and enables you to do a lot more with what you have.  Look for more on this in a future post.

I’m listening more regularly now so more feedback is coming. That’s about it for now.

Go Forth And Game,

tomg

 

What is a ‘great’ game?


I got an idea from GamerChris’ latest blog entry.  Check it here.  Chris talks about what makes a great game versus what makes a fun one.  I agree with him on this. A game’s goal is fun.  If it is not fun, it will not get played and will eventually fade away.  ‘Great’ is subjective.  When we talk about great games we usually are including fun AND design. My example is Macao.  But can elegant design alone mean a game is great?  It depends on who you are talking to and what you are discussing.   I haven’t played many of the games listed at the top of the BGG list.   Words used to describe many of these include elegant, ‘well designed’, ‘ground breaking’, and ‘innovative’.  But are they great?  Maybe.  By the above definition great games should be both elegant and fun.  I like to believe that the BGG subscribers’ rankings include the fun element.

Fun games on the other hand don’t have to be great.  Chris gave an example of Bang! for this.  I suggest Tkii Topple in this category.  This category of games give you that excitement that you play games for.  ‘Fun’ is also subjective.   Sometimes it can be jump up and down, whooping it up fun.  Sometimes it is successfully solving a puzzle.  It depends on you and what you are after at that particular time.

So what about you?  What makes a great game?  What makes a fun game?  How about suggest some games that are both.  Give me one great game and one fun game and tell me why each is in its category.

Come on.  Give me some feedback on this.